randomlancila:

Lol, ‘bobcollege’.
I, as a morbidly obese person, know plenty about nutrition. Enough to know that your body is not a simple addition problem. It’s not just what you eat vs. how much exercise you get and then what’s left over. Sorry.
Opulence? Oh really. That argument may have worked in the 1500s, but not today. Do me a favor, tell the millions of families living in poverty who can only afford the dollar menu and additive filled frozen foods, families who are obese as a result, that their obesity is the result of ‘opulence’. Don’t get TOO upset when they laugh in your face. I don’t know how many times I have to say it: obesity levels rise as income levels fall. 
Ignorance? In some cases that’s true but nowadays you can’t turn on the TV without some show hawking some diet plan or exercise program at you. I’m pretty sure it’s basic knowledge that eating healthier and exercising more leads to a healthier lifestyle.
You are being classist by assuming everyone has the means to eat healthy, whether or not they have the knowledge. It’s just not that simple.
But, as I’ve said a bazillion times, health does not come in ONE body shape. And to chalk it up to ‘nutrition’ is an insult to the intricate and multifaceted ways in which our bodies operate. You’re assuming that everyone processes calories the same way, everyone has the same metabolism, everyone can do it if only they just try hard enough. You are wrong.
It’s been said over and over. Why is it that we can ALL accept, and we ALL know those people who can eat and eat and eat and never gain an ounce, never worry about getting fat no matter what or how much they eat. We ALL know that person, and yet a person who exercises and eats right and is STILL FAT is unfathomable? It’s hypocritical, and it’s wrong.
I can sit here and argue facts with you all day, because I’ve got an arsenal, but I don’t have to. If you don’t read ANYTHING else I just wrote, read this: It doesn’t matter what someone looks like. It doesn’t matter how they got the way they did. It is not YOUR right, responsibility, or place to judge them, speculate, offer advice, or assume you know better than them. And no one needs to explain or justify the way they look. They don’t need to offer excuses or apologize. So unless it’s your body, keep your ignorance, your comments, and your so-called ‘knowledge’ to yourself. No one wants to hear it. You want to talk about bias? Look at yourself instead of pointing the finger at me.
~Amber

randomlancila:

Lol, ‘bobcollege’.

I, as a morbidly obese person, know plenty about nutrition. Enough to know that your body is not a simple addition problem. It’s not just what you eat vs. how much exercise you get and then what’s left over. Sorry.

Opulence? Oh really. That argument may have worked in the 1500s, but not today. Do me a favor, tell the millions of families living in poverty who can only afford the dollar menu and additive filled frozen foods, families who are obese as a result, that their obesity is the result of ‘opulence’. Don’t get TOO upset when they laugh in your face. I don’t know how many times I have to say it: obesity levels rise as income levels fall. 

Ignorance? In some cases that’s true but nowadays you can’t turn on the TV without some show hawking some diet plan or exercise program at you. I’m pretty sure it’s basic knowledge that eating healthier and exercising more leads to a healthier lifestyle.

You are being classist by assuming everyone has the means to eat healthy, whether or not they have the knowledge. It’s just not that simple.

But, as I’ve said a bazillion times, health does not come in ONE body shape. And to chalk it up to ‘nutrition’ is an insult to the intricate and multifaceted ways in which our bodies operate. You’re assuming that everyone processes calories the same way, everyone has the same metabolism, everyone can do it if only they just try hard enough. You are wrong.

It’s been said over and over. Why is it that we can ALL accept, and we ALL know those people who can eat and eat and eat and never gain an ounce, never worry about getting fat no matter what or how much they eat. We ALL know that person, and yet a person who exercises and eats right and is STILL FAT is unfathomable? It’s hypocritical, and it’s wrong.

I can sit here and argue facts with you all day, because I’ve got an arsenal, but I don’t have to. If you don’t read ANYTHING else I just wrote, read this: It doesn’t matter what someone looks like. It doesn’t matter how they got the way they did. It is not YOUR right, responsibility, or place to judge them, speculate, offer advice, or assume you know better than them. And no one needs to explain or justify the way they look. They don’t need to offer excuses or apologize. So unless it’s your body, keep your ignorance, your comments, and your so-called ‘knowledge’ to yourself. No one wants to hear it. You want to talk about bias? Look at yourself instead of pointing the finger at me.

~Amber



red3blog:

For your convenience, Fat Hate Bingo 12, and 3 all in one photoset. Pull them out and play with a friend the next time someone on the internet thinsplaining to you why your body is wrong and you really should be ashamed of it. Y’know, for national security.





Weight loss. Weight loss. Hair removal. Weight loss. Laundry soap. Weight loss.

I fucking hate commercials.



internal-acceptance-movement:

REASONS TO BE “THIN” AND WHY THEY AREN’T TRUE:
1. You can look in the mirror, and feel good about what you see. 
No number on the scale will ever be low enough to make you accept what you see in the mirror. Not because there is something wrong with your body, but because you don’t have an accurate perception of the way you look. The truth is that the way you feel about your body has little to do with your actual weight, and much more to do with the way you feel about who you are as a person. When you’re able to accept yourself and  embrace your flaws, who you are becomes enough and the desire to change your body in order to compensate for your faults no longer feels necessary. When you can love the person you are inside, you are able to love the person you see in the mirror.   
2. So that people will like you better and want to be your friend.
 Anyone who chooses their friends based on the way they look is not someone you should be interested in pursuing a friendship with. You don’t choose your friends based on how thin they are. You choose them because of who they are and how they make you feel. You’re friends with people who make you laugh and smile. People who are there to listen and validate your experience. People who share your interests and beliefs. People who make you happy. You are no exception.
3. Nothing tastes as good as thin feels. 
 Thinness is not synonymous with happiness. Being happy feels good. Pushing yourself beyond healthy means to achieve a perfect body, does not. Restricting makes you feel deprived, depressed, and detached. You feel weak, lightheaded, and dizzy. You have no energy and can’t concentrate. The time you take to obsessively exercise and count calories leaves you with little time to invest in your friendships, leaving you to feel isolated, lonely, and disconnected, with nothing but the scale as your friend. Ultimately, being “thin” causes you to lose so much more than weight. You lose friends, opportunities, and life experiences. You miss out on fun, love, and connection. You miss out on life.
4. Guys/girls will be attracted to you.
 No matter what size you wear or what shape your body is, there will always be someone who isn’t attracted to you. Not because you’re inadequate or ugly, but because every person is unique in the qualities and features they find attractive in others. Beauty comes in every shape and size. It doesn’t discriminate. And honestly, beauty transcends appearance. Being attractive is less about having a beautiful body, and much more about having a beautiful soul. People can be beautiful in looks, but they can also be beautiful because of who they are. Because of how they make you feel. Because of the way they make you laugh and smile. Because they have made a difference in people’s lives. The way you look is such a small part of who you are. You are so much more than a number on the scale. And if a person chooses not to be attracted to you solely because of the way you look, then they aren’t worth your time.
5. People will remember you as the “beautiful, thin one”.
 Is that really what you want to be remembered for when you die? For your appearance and weight? Because when I die, I want people to remember me for the person I am. I want to be remembered for being kind and loving and compassionate. I want to be remembered for being intelligent and brave and trustworthy. I want to be remembered for my integrity, my values, and my beliefs. I want to be remembered as a good friend and sister and daughter. I want to be remembered as someone who made a difference.

Reblogging for the commentary.

internal-acceptance-movement:

REASONS TO BE “THIN” AND WHY THEY AREN’T TRUE:

1. You can look in the mirror, and feel good about what you see.

No number on the scale will ever be low enough to make you accept what you see in the mirror. Not because there is something wrong with your body, but because you don’t have an accurate perception of the way you look. The truth is that the way you feel about your body has little to do with your actual weight, and much more to do with the way you feel about who you are as a person. When you’re able to accept yourself and embrace your flaws, who you are becomes enough and the desire to change your body in order to compensate for your faults no longer feels necessary. When you can love the person you are inside, you are able to love the person you see in the mirror.

2. So that people will like you better and want to be your friend.

Anyone who chooses their friends based on the way they look is not someone you should be interested in pursuing a friendship with. You don’t choose your friends based on how thin they are. You choose them because of who they are and how they make you feel. You’re friends with people who make you laugh and smile. People who are there to listen and validate your experience. People who share your interests and beliefs. People who make you happy. You are no exception.

3. Nothing tastes as good as thin feels.

Thinness is not synonymous with happiness. Being happy feels good. Pushing yourself beyond healthy means to achieve a perfect body, does not. Restricting makes you feel deprived, depressed, and detached. You feel weak, lightheaded, and dizzy. You have no energy and can’t concentrate. The time you take to obsessively exercise and count calories leaves you with little time to invest in your friendships, leaving you to feel isolated, lonely, and disconnected, with nothing but the scale as your friend. Ultimately, being “thin” causes you to lose so much more than weight. You lose friends, opportunities, and life experiences. You miss out on fun, love, and connection. You miss out on life.

4. Guys/girls will be attracted to you.

No matter what size you wear or what shape your body is, there will always be someone who isn’t attracted to you. Not because you’re inadequate or ugly, but because every person is unique in the qualities and features they find attractive in others. Beauty comes in every shape and size. It doesn’t discriminate. And honestly, beauty transcends appearance. Being attractive is less about having a beautiful body, and much more about having a beautiful soul. People can be beautiful in looks, but they can also be beautiful because of who they are. Because of how they make you feel. Because of the way they make you laugh and smile. Because they have made a difference in people’s lives. The way you look is such a small part of who you are. You are so much more than a number on the scale. And if a person chooses not to be attracted to you solely because of the way you look, then they aren’t worth your time.

5. People will remember you as the “beautiful, thin one”.

Is that really what you want to be remembered for when you die? For your appearance and weight? Because when I die, I want people to remember me for the person I am. I want to be remembered for being kind and loving and compassionate. I want to be remembered for being intelligent and brave and trustworthy. I want to be remembered for my integrity, my values, and my beliefs. I want to be remembered as a good friend and sister and daughter. I want to be remembered as someone who made a difference.

Reblogging for the commentary.







redefiningbodyimage:

holyfarts:

istandagainstweightbullying:

Natalie Monet, Griselangel Paula, Alicia Fajardo, Tess Munster, Natalie “lovenati” Ferraro, Bethany Weber.

every body is a beach body if it’s at the motherfuckin beach. 

yussss

redefiningbodyimage:

holyfarts:

istandagainstweightbullying:

Natalie Monet, Griselangel Paula, Alicia Fajardo, Tess Munster, Natalie “lovenati” Ferraro, Bethany Weber.

every body is a beach body if it’s at the motherfuckin beach. 

yussss



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